By: Kalie Lowrie / Texas Baptist Communications

Other program participants included Sylvia B. Johnson-Matthews, executive director/CEO of Houston Pregnancy Help Center; Jairo Sandoval-Pilego, pastor of San Jose Catholic Church in Austin; U.S. Representative Chip Roy; Claire Culwell, an abortion survivor; State Rep. Jeff Leach; Terry Beatley, president of the Hosea Initiative; and Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life.

The Texas Alliance for Life, a nonprofit organization that advocates for pro-life issues in the state, coordinated the rally on the south steps of the Capitol.

By: DANIEL FRIEND

The rally in Austin was organized by the Texas Alliance for Life, with several other Christian and pro-life organizations serving on the host committee, including the Baptist General Convention of Texas, the Christian Life Commission, Relevant Radio, and the Bridge Christian talk radio.

By: Blaine Young

The Texas Alliance for Life organized the rally in Texas, which was meant to send a message to elected officials about the demand for anti-abortion legislation, said Amy O’Donnell, the Texas Alliance for Life communication director.

“It is our chance to show the media and our elected officials that Texas values life,” O’Donnell said. “There are so many across the state that have taken part in (rallies) locally and come here on buses to take part. Texas really s our babies and values life.”

By: Heather Osbourne

Amy O’Donnell, communications director for Texas Rally for Life, said the mission of the annual event was to “show the media and our elected officials that Texas is pro-life.”

O’Donnell said it was also to commemorate the 47th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that established a woman’s legal right to an abortion.

By: KVUE staff

AUSTIN, Texas — Thousands of demonstrators to part in Austin’s annual Texas Rally for Life on Saturday afternoon.

The anti-abortion rally kicked off around 1 p.m. at the intersection of 14th Street and San Jacinto Boulevard in Downtown Austin, with a march to the Capitol.

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, the crowd size was between 5,000 and 6,000 people. Around 5,000 people attended the event last year.