By: BeLynn Hollers

Rhonda Kay Moreland
Board member of Texas Alliance for Life and chairman of the board of directors of BirthChoice Dallas Pregnancy Center

Q1: I think the very first thing that I want every woman to know is that I come from a place of love and non-judgment. And that I’m here to have a conversation and I’m trying to empower women, to understand what I’ve learned about what I understand is the truth of life. And I think that there’s no judgement to anybody who’s had an abortion. We all have a story, we all have a past, but our past doesn’t define us. And so I’m in the movement as much for the women as I am for the babies.

Q2: If I could do something with somebody who thinks opposite than me on the abortion issue, it would be connecting women towards resources for help. I think that is probably a great starting point, is just connecting women with assistance in all aspects of their life.

By: Monica Madden

Hours after the judge issued the temporary restraining order, Paxton announced he is “immediately appealing” the decision, in a post on Twitter.

“Today a Harris County judge froze pre-Roe laws criminalizing abortion in TX. But w/ SCOTUS’s Dobbs decision, these laws are 100% in effect & constitutional. The judge’s decision is wrong. I’m immediately appealing. I’ll ensure we have all the legal tools to keep TX pro-life!” Paxton tweeted.

Joe Pojman, the executive director of the Texas Alliance for Life, echoed the attorney general’s sentiments and said he was not concerned about the legal action from providers hoping to block the pre-Roe law from being enforced.

“We think that is just a bump in the road and not a dead end for the pre-Roe laws. I think they will go back into effect in a matter of weeks and unborn babies will be protected,” Pojman said.

He noted that regardless of what happens with this case, the trigger law will still eventually kick in, banning the majority of abortions in Texas, 30 days after the Supreme Court issues a judgment for the Dobbs v. Jackson case.

The next hearing on this case is set for July 12, when the court will consider more permanent action.

By: ARIANA PEREZ-CASTELLS, ELEANOR KLIBANOFF AND ERIN DOUGLAS

Paul Linton, an attorney for the anti-abortion group Texas Alliance for Life, said he thought a higher court would soon vacate the temporary restraining order and that the pre-Roe abortion ban should stand.

“I don’t think it has any merit,” Linton said. “I don’t think there’s any plausible argument that the laws have been expressly repealed, and the repeal-by-implication argument, I think, is very weak.”

By: REENA DIAMANTE

It has not been used for nearly a half-century, but some abortion opponents believe it is fair game after Roe’s reversal.

“They have ceased doing abortions because of the threat of prosecution under that pre-Roe law,” Joe Pojman, executive director for Texas Alliance for Life, said. “I’m very grateful that for right now, it appears that unborn babies are not being aborted. Hopefully, those women are being told about the alternatives, the vast resources available to them if they choose to give birth to the child.”

By: BY CAROLINE VANDERGRIFF

“Violence is not a solution to violence, and we consider abortion to very much be a violent act,” said Amy O’Donnell, communications director for Texas Alliance for Life.

O’Donnell pointed to the state’s Alternatives to Abortion program, which is allotted more than $100 million to crisis pregnancy centers, maternity homes, and adoption agencies, as a resource to help women experiencing domestic violence.

“As imperfect as our systems are, the state of Texas does have a responsibility, as well as the pro-life movement, to do everything possible to help any woman in a domestic violence situation or a rape/incest situation and her unborn child to get out of any abusive situations and move forward and support them in choosing life,” O’Donnell said.

Advocates want victims to know the recent Supreme Court ruling doesn’t change the fact that they still have options.

“Survivors shouldn’t believe the lie that help is not available to them, because it is,” Shetter said.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 800-799-7233. Those looking for help can also call or text the Genesis Women’s Shelter hotline at 214-946-4357. You can reach One Safe Place at 817-916-4323.

By: WILLIAM MELHADO

On the other side, those celebrating the end of abortion in Texas also believe Friday’s ruling will rally voters to continue supporting the anti-abortion cause.

“I believe that our pro-life voters will feel empowered to continue voting,” Amy O’Donnell, a spokesperson for Texas Alliance for Life, told the Tribune. While she hesitates to make political predictions, O’Donnell says she anticipates the decision will spur voters to “come out in droves” in November.

O’Donnell attributes the success of anti-abortion advocates to “playing the long game for 49 years, advocating for life on a national basis, on a statewide basis. … We’ll continue to do that.”

Now, abortion-rights advocates say they need to follow that model.