By: Jala Washington, Jaclyn Ramkissoon

Groups like the Texas Alliance for Life want more awareness about the resources pregnant women have outside of abortions.

“We wish those organizations who are suing would realize the new reality and really help women with unplanned pregnancies to find compassionate alternatives to abortion,” Texas Alliance for Life Executive Director Joe Pojman said. Pojman shared a list of pro-life pregnancy support resources.

According to Pojman, the Texas Legislature gave $100 million to the program to help with abortion alternatives.

“Texas has been well prepared for this moment,” Pojman said.

By: By Katie Yoder

Texas Alliance for Life Communications Director Amy O’Donnell also expressed gratitude for Abbott and stressed that the Netherlands should learn from Texas’ example.

“It is unfortunate that Queen Máxima and Minister Schreinemacher are under the misconception that Gov. Abbott needs schooling on the abortion issue and the ability of women to advance in society,” O’Donnell told CNA. “We have complete confidence that governor and First Lady Abbott can educate the Dutch royals on how Texas successfully protects unborn babies from abortion while providing vast resources for women with unplanned pregnancies.”

Among other things, the Texas Pregnancy Care Network, funded entirely with general revenues from the state of Texas, offers help to mothers and babies by supporting pregnancy centers, maternity homes, and more, CNA previously reported.

O’Donnell added: “Texas proves that women have the ability to achieve economic and social equality without abortion.”

By: News Release & Posted By Staff

PoliTech will host a panel forum to discuss the topic of Abortion in Texas. This is an important issue in which constructive discourse is crucial at this time. The group of 6 panelists includes representatives from special-interest groups and state legislators from across the political spectrum.

www.facebook.com/politechusa
Senator Charles Perry (R), Texas District 28
Kathleen Brown (D), US District 13 Congressional Candidate -Delma Limones, AVOW Texas
Mark Lee Dickson, Right to Life
Amy O’Donnell, Texas Alliance for Life
Dr Allison Gilbert, OB/GYN, Southwestern Women’s Center
Time & Venue:

Thursday, September 8th @ 7:00 PM
Mckenzie-Merket Alumni Center
2521 17th St Lubbock TX 79409
EVENT OPEN TO PUBLIC AND ADMISSION IS FREE
Event will be live-streamed on our YouTube channel & Facebook

By: Barbara Campos

La Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos oficializó el martes el fallo del caso Dobbs versus Organización para la Salud de la Mujer de Jackson, Mississippi, una demanda que buscaba prohibir el aborto tras las 15 semanas de gestación.

La formalización del dictamen dio luz verde a la implementación de la ley de activación automática de Texas el 25 de agosto. Cerca de la mitad de los estados del país promulgaron medidas similares.

“Este es un momento que apenas me atreví a soñar que sucedería en mi vida, pero aquí está”, dijo Joe Pojman, activista de la Alianza de Texas por la Vida.

En un mes, Texas castigará la practica con penas de hasta vida en prisión y multas de hasta $100,000. La ley SB-8 o del latido, también permite demandar a quien asista en la interrupción de un embarazo por hasta $10,000. La única excepción será si la vida de la madre está en peligro.

“La legislatura también asignó más de $100 millones para el altamente exitoso programa de alternativas al aborto a fin de brindar todos los servicios que una mujer necesita con un embarazo no planificado para llevar con éxito a ese bebé a término, dar a luz, conservar ese bebé o ponerlo en adopción”, dijo Pojman.

Por otra parte, la presidenta de Whole Woman’s Health, Amy Hagstrom Miller, envió un comunicado a la redacción de Telemundo Austin para declarar que la decisión del máximo tribunal era algo que esperaban, describiéndola como “el comienzo del fin de la atención legal del aborto en Texas”. La entidad operaba varias clínicas de salud reproductiva en Texas y se comprometió a seguir ayudando a las mujeres a obtener el servicio donde siga siendo legal.

“Cualquier mujer que busque un aborto en otro estado, esas situaciones rompen nuestros corazones porque eso significa que no está familiarizada con los vastos recursos disponibles en Texas y aquí mismo en Austin”, dijo Pojman.

By: BeLynn Hollers

Rhonda Kay Moreland
Board member of Texas Alliance for Life and chairman of the board of directors of BirthChoice Dallas Pregnancy Center

Q1: I think the very first thing that I want every woman to know is that I come from a place of love and non-judgment. And that I’m here to have a conversation and I’m trying to empower women, to understand what I’ve learned about what I understand is the truth of life. And I think that there’s no judgement to anybody who’s had an abortion. We all have a story, we all have a past, but our past doesn’t define us. And so I’m in the movement as much for the women as I am for the babies.

Q2: If I could do something with somebody who thinks opposite than me on the abortion issue, it would be connecting women towards resources for help. I think that is probably a great starting point, is just connecting women with assistance in all aspects of their life.

By: Anna North

That’s already happening. “If at some point Roe v. Wade is overturned, we’re going to have to step up and fund places like these centers to be able to reach out to all those women who are now going, ‘I need help,’” Arkansas state Rep. Cindy Crawford, a Republican, told the Associated Press in March. Edmonds, the Louisiana representative, is backing a bill that would earmark $1 million from the state budget to help the centers build an online service network.

That’s on top of money that the centers already get from Louisiana and other states around the country as part of “alternatives to abortion” programs, which have been around since the 1990s and have grown in recent years. The largest, in Texas, received $100 million over two years in the latest budget cycle, and abortion opponents hope to see that grow further. “We always are working toward the increase in funding for the alternatives to abortion program,” said Amy O’Donnell, director of communications for the group Texas Alliance for Life.

“Our goal is to help women remove obstacles that they may face in going through an unplanned pregnancy so that they can successfully give birth to the baby and then keep that baby with support or place that baby for adoption, if that’s their choice,” O’Donnell said. “With that, we recognize that they’re going to need support both before and after birth.”

Critics say the anti-abortion safety net … isn’t one
Pregnancy resource centers do offer some forms of support to the people who visit them. In a small study published in 2020, Kimport found that women who visited the centers got things like baby clothes and prenatal vitamins, as well as services like pregnancy tests. Especially for low-income people, the centers can fill some of the gaps in states where more conventional social services, from Medicaid to food stamps, have been cut to the bone.

However, researchers and reproductive rights advocates have deep concerns about the idea that pregnancy resource centers could step in to become a substitute for the right to an abortion.

At the most basic level, the centers do not provide abortion, which is something a lot of people want. Reproductive rights groups argue that support during an unplanned pregnancy is no substitute for the choice of whether to carry that pregnancy to term. “There’s nothing that a crisis pregnancy center can offer that is equal to getting an abortion,” said Morgan Moone, strategic data and advocacy manager for the New Orleans-based Reproductive Justice Action Collective (ReJAC). “Abortion is providing opportunity; it’s providing autonomy over an individual’s body.”

People who are seeking abortion may not be interested in goods and services to help them carry the pregnancy to term instead. Kimport’s research suggests that pregnancy resource centers are not especially popular. During a two-year period of recruiting study participants at prenatal clinics, she and her team were able to find only 21 people who had been to such a center and were willing to talk about the experience (and only a handful who had visited one but didn’t want to talk).

The majority of people who had visited the centers were not considering abortion; they just needed assistance continuing a wanted pregnancy. After Texas passed the restrictive abortion law SB 8, abortions among Texans fell by only about 10 percent, suggesting that most people in the state who wanted abortions found a way to get them — they did not visit a pregnancy center for support in giving birth and raising a child.

Another concern is the actual services that pregnancy resource centers provide. Research from the University of Georgia has found that while the centers sometimes present themselves as medical providers and offer services like ultrasounds, they also often spread misinformation about abortion, such as the false claim that it causes breast cancer. The centers often are not staffed by medical personnel. One 2007 study conducted by the NARAL ProChoice Maryland Fund found that just 18 percent of Maryland centers had staff with medical training. In addition, anti-abortion centers may spread misinformation about sexually transmitted infections and contraception, or provide no information at all.

“That’s harmful,” said Obiekea, of the Black Women for Wellness Action Project. “This is information about your health.”

The centers are also not subject to the same ethical and privacy regulations that govern medical clinics. The centers can collect and store data on clients’ sexual and reproductive history, test results, ultrasounds, and more, according to Time. That data could then be turned over to law enforcement to sue or prosecute abortion providers or even pregnant people themselves.

Most pregnancy resource centers remain affiliated with churches or other Christian groups, and Christian religious messages are typically part of their counseling. Anti-abortion advocates say the centers are still open to all, regardless of religion: “There are some who may look for an open-door opportunity to share their Christian views, but they are also very happy to navigate around that,” O’Donnell said. According to Kimport, however, while people don’t have to be Christian to visit a center, hearing the religious messages is typically “not optional.”