By: Richard Wolf

“We realize that there’s not a realistic way to ban abortions. They are going to remain readily available,” says Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, which helped write the state law. Given that, he says, “we believe that the states should protect the health and safety of women who are undergoing abortions.”

By: Rick Jervis

Overall funding for women’s health services is at a historic high in Texas; it’s just not going to clinics that perform abortions, said Joe Pojman, head of the anti-abortion group Texas Alliance for Life. This year, state lawmakers earmarked than $130 million for services ranging from breast and cervical cancer screenings to family planning counseling and pregnancy centers, according to state figures.

By: Rick Jervis

“Our goal is that no woman will choose to seek abortions,” says Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, who helped draft the current law. “We realize that vision is not going to be reality in the foreseeable future. In the meantime, we want to ensure women have all the information they have to make an informed decision.”

By: Michael Kunzelman

“The Supreme Court allows states to regulate abortion to ensure women have all the information they need to make an informed decision and to make sure it’s done in a safe manner,” Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, said outside the courtroom after the hearing. “That’s all this law does.”