By: Fred Cantu

Pro-life groups saw it as the end of the line for a law they believe protected unborn children since 1854. Joe Pojman with Texas Alliance for Life adds, “It made abortion legal in Texas and in all the other states, legal throughout the entire 9 months of pregnancy.”
But others saw the high court’s ruling as a new beginning for women.

Dyana Limon-Mercado with Planned Parenthood Texas Votes explains, “When you think about the ways certain communities’ rights to their own bodies, to their own labor, to their own futures have been restricted over the history of America, the decision around Roe v. Wade was fundamental to guaranteeing that right, particularly to women who become pregnant.”

By: David Montgomery

Joe Pojman, a former aerospace engineer who is now executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, said the law “would completely protect unborn children from abortion beginning at conception.

“That would be the fulfillment of our dreams and goals for the last 50 years.”

But Cain and Capriglione, along with anti-abortion leaders like Pojman, emphatically dismiss the possibility of prosecuting women who get abortions, saying the criminal offenses should apply only to doctors and others who perform the procedure.

Texas’ pre-Roe abortion statute, which originated in 1854, “never even contemplated making … any penalties for the woman who has the abortion,” Capriglione said, “and my bill doesn’t either.”

By: News Release & Posted By Staff

PoliTech will host a panel forum to discuss the topic of Abortion in Texas. This is an important issue in which constructive discourse is crucial at this time. The group of 6 panelists includes representatives from special-interest groups and state legislators from across the political spectrum.

www.facebook.com/politechusa
Senator Charles Perry (R), Texas District 28
Kathleen Brown (D), US District 13 Congressional Candidate -Delma Limones, AVOW Texas
Mark Lee Dickson, Right to Life
Amy O’Donnell, Texas Alliance for Life
Dr Allison Gilbert, OB/GYN, Southwestern Women’s Center
Time & Venue:

Thursday, September 8th @ 7:00 PM
Mckenzie-Merket Alumni Center
2521 17th St Lubbock TX 79409
EVENT OPEN TO PUBLIC AND ADMISSION IS FREE
Event will be live-streamed on our YouTube channel & Facebook

By: Taylor Goldenstein

Amy O’Donnell, spokeswoman for the Texas Alliance for Life, said judicial bypass is no longer necessary. Texas law already allows doctors to perform abortions during medical emergencies when there is “insufficient time” to provide parental notice.

But in general, she said, “abortion isn’t legal in our state, so there’s no need to seek a judicial bypass for a procedure that’s not legal in Texas.”

She added: “When a minor is facing unplanned pregnancy, it’s our hope that any adult they reach out to will assist them in giving birth to their baby and point them to organizations or resources that will support them in either raising the child or towards placing the child in a loving home for adoption.”

By: Kevin Daley

Texas’s experience suggests that overturning Roe v. Wade will not prove to be a seismic political event, at least as far as election outcomes are concerned. The muted reaction to the Texas Heartbeat Act, the beginning of the end of abortion in Texas, only emboldened pro-life elements across the state.

“The sun rose as usual. Life went on. And there was not a tsunami of opposition to that law,” said Joe Pojman, Ph.D., an aerospace engineer who now leads the Texas Alliance for Life.

Pojman told the Washington Free Beacon that his group viewed the Heartbeat Act’s enactment as a “dress rehearsal” for the possibility that Roe would be overturned, which came to pass in June. The ensuing weeks gave them a chance to fine-tune talking points and assess reaction from coalition partners.
The following months were all the more encouraging, Pojman told the Free Beacon. The alliance endorsed dozens of candidates in Republican primaries across the state, he said, and he did not detect any reticence or hesitancy from Republican lawmakers, an assessment shared by other Texas Republicans the Free Beacon interviewed.

“People running for office all up and down the ballot cannot be pro-life enough in the Republican primary,”

Pojman told the Free Beacon. “Our PAC interviewed dozens of candidates for Congress, the state house, and statewide elected office. It’s amazing. Virtually everyone is more pro-life than Mother Teresa.”

By: https://www.texastribune.org/2022/07/13/texas-ivf-treatments/?fbclid=IwAR3Wqzr_KDJalB210sBJZayqmjVx4s4LniV2uqCg4EMFMONv_0cWDxk2AUQ

Two of Texas’ most well-known anti-abortion groups — Texas Alliance for Life and Texas Right to Life — also say the state’s laws and more recent definition of abortion should not affect or inhibit IVF treatment, even if they include the term embryo.

“Abortion is, according to Texas law, causing the death of the child, who is a child of a woman known to be pregnant,” John Seago, president of Texas Right to Life, said pointing to a statute the Legislature amended a few years ago outlining what counts as an abortion.

“There’s also no such thing as an abortion outside of a woman’s womb, so when you look at what’s happening in the laboratory with assisted reproductive technology, that is not destruction of an embryo,” he added.

This language likely leaves IVF treatment intact, legal scholars told the Tribune. A district attorney could decide to try to test the issue by bringing a case against a fertility doctor, said Josh Blackman, a constitutional law professor at South Texas College of Law Houston. But he added that challenging IVF doesn’t appear to be an area “ripe” for action in the anti-abortion movement.

Seago said Texas Right to Life has concerns about the “destruction” of “excessive” embryos, particularly in medical research, but the issue is not one of its priorities for Texas’ 2023 legislative session. Instead, its priorities include enforcing existing laws against abortion and providing more support for pregnant women.

Amy O’Donnell, a spokesperson for the Texas Alliance for Life, said the group had not finalized its legislative priorities yet, but said the group supported a law passed in 2017 requiring the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services to post information on its website about embryo donations to other people to promote the option.