By: Natalie Kitroeff

Legal experts say such laws may be challenged after the F.D.A. decision, but for now, these state measures could discourage American doctors from sending pills to parts of the country with restrictive regulations.

“For the first time, Texas does have a way to protect women, through our criminal law, from people bringing dangerous abortion pills,” said Joe Pojman, executive director of the Texas Alliance for Life, an organization that helped craft the measure. “We’ll have to wait to see how well it is enforced in the coming months.”

Anti-abortion groups acknowledge that criminally punishing activists who distribute the pills, especially if they are from Mexico, may prove difficult. They would have to be caught and arrested in Texas, or extradited, experts say.

By: Roni Caryn Rabin

Supporters of the law say their goal is to save the life of every embryo, regardless of the circumstances of conception.

“We never advocate taking a life of an unborn child unless it is necessary to protect the life of a woman,” said Joe Pojman, executive director of the Texas Alliance for Life.

Even in cases of rape or incest, “we don’t advocate for taking the life of an unborn child for the crime of the father,” he said.

The law’s supporters say that it provides sufficient leeway for physicians to act if a mother’s life or bodily functions are compromised, and they insist those cases are rare.

By: Christine Hauser

Ms. Smith’s speech also drew strong reactions from opponents of abortion who support the law.

“How sad Paxton has bought the lie that women have to eradicate unplanned pregnancies to achieve dreams & goals,” Amy O’Donnell, a speswoman for the Texas Alliance for Life, said on . “Women can give life to their babies AND do great things.”

The law, which goes into effect on Sept. 1, bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, regardless of whether the pregnancy was a result of rape or incest. The legislation, also known as the “heartbeat law,” is among the most restrictive abortion measures in the country.

By: Edgar Sandoval and Dave Montgomery

Joe Pojman, the executive director with the Texas Alliance for Life, an anti-abortion advocacy group, said the new law would face difficult legal challenges, but it nonetheless left him optimistic about the direction of the anti-abortion movement. He pointed to the growing number of states and localities that have passed restrictive measures.

By: Sabrina Tavernise

Abortion is another example. Joe Pojman, the executive director of the Texas Alliance for Life, said his organization was focused not just on helping Mr. Trump win the state, but also on the down-ballot races for the Texas House, which Democrats hope to flip.

If that happens, Mr. Pojman said, “it would be very difficult to advance our agenda.”

One goal, he said, is a “trigger law” that would ban abortion in the state if and when Roe v. Wade is overturned. The new composition of the Supreme Court is seen as having made such a reversal of a possibility, and similar bills have passed in other Republican-controlled states.