By: Carissa Lehmkuhl

Meanwhile, those in support of the law are grateful for the past eight days. “By our estimation, there are as many as 200 unborn babies’ lives who are saved every day that law is in effect,” said Dr. Joe Pojman, executive director of the Texas Alliance for Life.

A controversial and unique aspect of the law is that it allows any person to sue anyone who performs or aids in an abortion, something the DOJ says was designed to evade judicial review. However, Dr. Pojman said because of this provision, it’s unclear what the federal government’s role can or should be.

“Since there’s never been a law like this that has been created which allows citizens to enforce it, it’s not clear that the federal government is going to have a successful lawsuit; we’re going to have to see,” he said. “We’re kind of on new legal ground.”

By: Alejandra Guzman-Tracy

While pro-choice groups say this is a game-changer, pro-life organizations say this is a step in the wrong direction.

“We’re disappointed that the Biden Harris administration we would go to these lengths,” said Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life.

Lengths Attorney General Merrick Garland says are necessary.

“Eighty-five to 90 percent of abortions performed in Texas before this law was in effect, we’re on patients who are past the six-week mark,” Duble claimed.

The law also doesn’t make exceptions for victims of rape or incest

“The act is clearly unconstitutional under long-standing Supreme court precedent,” Garland said.

“We have to remember that if a woman is impregnated after a rape, that there are two parties involved to victims,” Pojman said. “The mother, who is the victim of rape, but also the innocent unborn child. And we should not advocate for taking the life of the unborn child.”

By: Erin Jones, Mauricio Chamberlin

Dr. Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, told VERIFY that the pro-life organization he founded in 1988 was adamant that there must be an exception included in SB 8 to allow a physician to terminate a pregnancy if the mother’s life is in danger.

“We have to have those exceptions for the life of the mother. Fortunately, those cases are very rare with modern science, but it could happen in the case of an ectopic, in other words, tubal pregnancy, when the unborn child is developing not in the uterus of the mother, but in a fallopian tube and if left unattended that fallopian tube could rupture, the child will certainly die, and it could risk the life of the mother through hemorrhaging. So, that has to be treated and the treatment is to take action to the end of pregnancy. The intent, of course, is not to take the life of the child, but to save the mother’s life, and an unintended result is that the child will die,” said Dr. Pojman.

Pojman says his organization did not recommend that the Texas Legislature include exceptions in the case of rape or incest.

“We have to recognize that the terrible, violent act of aggression of a rapist against a woman is an absolutely hideous act — it’s a bodily violation of that woman. But the question is, if in rare cases that that act results in the pregnancy of the woman, what’s the best thing for all parties involved? And, of course, we’re talking about the mother and the unborn child. We do not think a compassionate society should advocate the death of the unborn child because of the terrible act of the father of the child; that child is also an innocent victim, just as the woman,” said Pojman.

By: Melanie Barden

Thursday—the Texas Senate gave final approval for a controversial bill known as the “Heartbeat Bill.”

“It’s a bill that would protect unborn children in the womb from abortion beginning when the heartbeat is detected which is around 6 weeks,” says Joe Pojman with the Texas Alliance for Life.

Pojman says the bill is a novel concept—not just for Texas but the entire country.

There are no criminal penalties for performing abortions after a heartbeat is detected.

But it gives people the right to sue or file civil litigation against physicians who perform the procedure after that time frame.

Critics say the time frame isn’t long enough– as some women don’t know they’re pregnant that early on.

“I think the authors of the bill would argue the unborn child is still a person regardless of whether the mother knows the unborn child or not,” says Pojman.

The final bill includes several amendments including in situations of rape and incest—the person who impregnates someone cannot sue a doctor.

Amendments also specify doctors’ rights to defend their practice decisions in court.

The bill is now headed to Governor Greg Abbott’s desk where he’s signaled he’ll sign it in the coming days.

However, legal challenges are expected.

By: FOX 7 Austin Digital Team

AUSTIN, Texas – The Texas Senate has passed seven bills aimed at restricting access to abortions in Texas.

“We need to protect that unborn child and the mother, and that’s the goal of what the legislature is doing this time,” said Dr. Joe Pojman, executive director for Texas Alliance for Life.

The Texas Senate has given the ay to seven House bills aimed at restricting, and possibly even banning, abortions in the state. These bills will be turned over to the House for approval, but for Dr. Pojman this is a win.

“I’ve been lobbying for than 30 years; I never see a day like we’ve had in the Texas Senate. We need those safety regulations in place that protect a woman who’s having an abortion in Texas. Texas Alliance for Life, we’re a pro-life organization, we want to protect unborn babies,” he said.

By: Claudia Jimenez

The 2021 Texas Rally for Life is being held at the Capitol and virtually Saturday afternoon.

Organizers say people are gathering to protest the U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling, which legalized abortion nationwide. It was decided nearly 50 years ago on Jan. 22, 1973.

The event is being held from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Starting at 2 p.m., a livestream will begin from near the Capitol. The livestream will be broadcast on The Bridge at 101.1 FM and 1120 AM.

A recorded message from Gov. Greg Abbott will be shown. Other speakers include State Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), Bishop Joe Vasquez with the Catholic Diocese of Austin and Abby Johnson, a former Planned Parenthood director. A special proclamation will also be read.

Those who want to participate in the caravan should gather at the designated parking garages at 14th Street and San Jacinto Boulevard. Vehicles will leave from the garages starting at 1:30 p.m. to start a 30-minute loop around the city and the Capitol.

More than forty organizations are participating, including Texas Alliance for Life, Texas Values and Young Conservatives of Texas.